From the Blog

  • 5 Everyday Tasks Where Music Increases Productivity

    August 11, 2014   Alright, it's time to be honest with ourselves - music is distracting. If you're still in denial about this, then you're probably still finishing that report that was due 3 weeks ago. When it comes to listening to music, you must pick and choose your battles. For me, I know that when I write and listen to music simultaneously, the only words that will fill my page are the lyrics of the song.  So instead, I listen to my music as often as I can in environments where multi-tasking is possible and productivity is increased by my "tuneage." Working Out (shower) The first one, well two since they go together, is the ever-daunting workout followed by a relaxing shower. See, I could go to the gym without music in my ear, but then I would be surrounded by a symphony of unpleasant grunts and misplaced sex noises. Now with music, my workout suddenly inhabits a state of clarity where the motivational lyrics of my favorite musicians give me new motivation to conquer the last mile. Finally, music in your post-workout shower will change your life. Not only can you sing along to your favorite artist with out relentless humiliation, but you get to clean yourself in the process! Chores There isn't anything I hate more than sweeping the living room and doing dishes to the noise of obnoxious neighbors or blaring sirens. But as soon as I turn on Marvin Gaye and get in a state of soul filled OCD, all of the sudden the sinks empty and my floor's cleaner than a Pine Sol commercial. Repetitive Tasks At some point or another, you will be working a job that requires you to do mindless repetitive task, and you will lose your head unless you find something, anything, to make it bearable. Music! Insert your earbuds, blast your newest jam, and that repetitive, boring, devilish, unbearable task will suddenly be less cumbersome, and you may even find yourself working at double the rate.  Cooking   The only thing sweeter than the aromas of a delicious meal, is when its accompanied by the multiplatinum EDM artist Skrillex. Ok, well maybe not Skrillex, but music can definitely enhance the quality of the cooking and dining experience. The orchestral vibrations of Bach's Fifth Symphony can set the mood for a romantic evening, or maybe even inspire the extra dash of Tapatio you've been holding off on all these years. Music creates adventure, and with cooking that is never (sometimes) a bad thing.  Travel   The older we get, the more time we spend alone. Whether it be waiting in stop-and-go traffic or simply skateboarding to class, the world can be a lonely place. But it doesn't have to be! Taking the time to pick a song that fits your mood, can cut the perceived travel time in half - what felt like four hours before, now only feels like four minutes. Even if it isn't actually more productive, it at least feels a like less of a waste of time. By: Ben Slavich

  • Frankie Ballard - Light 'Em Up Tour

    August 8, 2014   Remember when your favorite country super star was on the rise? Yeah, you can't ever get those precious years when they were all yours, and yours only, back.

  • Catch MKTO's Yahoo Live Stream Today

    August 7, 2014   Today's a special day for MKTO fans everywhere. 

  • Music and Food: The Perfect Pairings

    July 31, 2014   A good song can make us salivate and the great ones can flat-out leave us hungry for more, but the folks at Turntable Kitchen have elevated that concept in ways that our senses never anticipated.

  • Four Venues that Leave Extra $ for a Drink

    July 28, 2014   Disclaimer: for L.A. folks and visitors!

  • PRE-SALE: Smallpools and Magic Man

    July 23, 2014   Starting today through Thursday, 7/24 at 10pm, purchase your tickets to see Smallpools and Magic Man presented by Ones To Watch with Skype this fall!

  • 9 Ways To Go To Concerts Without Breaking The Bank

    July 16, 2014   Now that it's midsummer and the semi-annual sales are flooding the retail stores, you may want to enjoy the remainder of July before fall hits.

  • Why It's Not The End Of The World to Catch a Concert By Yourself

    July 9, 2014   It's natural to take pity on the lone stranger who dines out or goes to the movies alone, but why? A solo outing isn't a proclamation to the world that you don't have anyone to accompany you. The thought of attending an event in public, by yourself might make you feel like an outcast on social display, but it's not the case. When it comes to concerts, I, for one, know I'd rather endure the imagined scrutiny of my fellow concert-goers than miss a great show or an artist I'd been dying to see. In fact, I've been to several shows by myself because, as a journalist, sometimes that's just the nature of the job. And guess what? The world kept spinning. Here are some reasons to consider catching a concert without a plus-one. The devil is always in the details, which suggests there is a correlation between positive experience and proximity to the stage: the closer you are, the more you see (if you're willing to be jostled a bit by your neighbors). It's much easier to finagle your way to the front when you're only maneuvering one body, and people seem to notice less, too. The chain-gang, let's-all-hold-hands-and-snake-through strategy never works out well, and you can do a lot better by yourself You're not bogged down by social obligations, like taking the perfect Instagram photograph with all your friends that prove you all went and saw that awesome band. Unless you're the confident type, you probably won't draw attention to yourself by taking a selfie at the event to prove you went solo. You also don't have to sacrifice the real estate you claimed in the front row to accompany your friend to the bathroom, the bar, etc. People watching. As though those two words aren't self-explanatory enough, there is an eerie joy in being the unseen observer. It can be pretty fascinating to note the age and gender demographic the musician draws, and whether they pull from strictly the hipster crowd or if they have fans that also listen to One Direction. Or, if you're weird like me, you can gawk at the hip piercings, tattoos and hairstyles or count the number of obscure, thrift-shop printed button-ups you see. None of it is ever quite noticeable until you're killing time before a show Airplane-syndrome. Just like when you're hurtling at approximately 500 mph at 35,000 feet above sea level, at a concert, you're trapped in a room for a finite amount of time with people you're in all likelihood never going to see ever again. It's the perfect time to bust out that embarrassing dance move or sport that outfit you aren't sure you can pull off. Being by yourself can be therapeutic. We all listen to music and go to shows to unwind, so why not use a concert as your personal form of meditation? The show is more personal. When you see a performer with a friend, the experience is split between your connection with the musician and with your companion. You exchange glances when the artist plays their mega-hit or whisper criticisms about the performance and nod along when your friend qualifies. Alone, you only rely on your own influence. You don't need to be a writer to jot down your opinion later. You might be surprised at your discovery. Don't sweat it if you get to the venue and you feel a burning need for social interaction. You already have one thing in common with every single person in the room: you're all there for the same reason. By: Alexa Girkout

  • 6 Comebacks Keeping Us On Our Toes in 2014

    July 3, 2014   Jimmy Eat World is planning to celebrate their 10th birthday by doing what they (and we) love the most - a new tour.

  • Spotlight on: Erik Hassle

    June 27, 2014   As luck would have it, 2014 has been the year for Erik Hassle to move alongside some of music’s most fascinating up-and-comers. Prior to joining breakout Danish artist Mø on a sold-out North American tour, the Swedish born singer-songwriter released his EP Somebody’s Party in February of this year, which included guest appearances by 2014 XXL freshman class’s Vic Mensa as well as rising R&B starlet Tinashe. For Hassle, whose past writing credits include the Shakira and Rihanna collaboration “Cant Remember To Forget You,” his EP marked a re-introduction to the world and a readiness to make it out on his own. Already surrounded by great company, Hassle is only getting started.  On Somebody’s Party, the track “Talk About It,” featuring Mensa, is an eerily recanting R&B ballad filled with dramatic vocals billowing forth from a sparse electronic arrangement. The song, detailing a problematic relationship sustained by one partner’s secretive suffering, is telling of Hassle’s talent for fusing narrative with a penchant for what constitutes the right amount of production, the basic formula to giving any song its real wings. From Somebody’s Party, one derives Hassle’s style is fashionably lean and smooth, geared towards and equally attuned to both R&B and pop. With his producing intuition and the fact that his vocal versatility alone could hold an audience, it’s almost as if he’s Timbaland and Justin Timberlake in one observing, hip package.  We recently caught up with Hassle in Los Angeles after he wrapped his tour with Mø. Watch our interview above, where we discuss songwriting and Somebody’s Party, and stay tuned for more updates on his album. 

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