Why It’s Not The End Of The World to Catch a Concert By Yourself

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It's natural to take pity on the lone stranger who dines out or goes to the movies alone, but why? A solo outing isn't a proclamation to the world that you don't have anyone to accompany you. The thought of attending an event in public, by yourself might make you feel like an outcast on social display, but it's not the case. When it comes to concerts, I, for one, know I'd rather endure the imagined scrutiny of my fellow concert-goers than miss a great show or an artist I'd been dying to see. In fact, I've been to several shows by myself because, as a journalist, sometimes that's just the nature of the job. And guess what? The world kept spinning. Here are some reasons to consider catching a concert without a plus-one.

The devil is always in the details, which suggests there is a correlation between positive experience and proximity to the stage: the closer you are, the more you see (if you're willing to be jostled a bit by your neighbors). It's much easier to finagle your way to the front when you're only maneuvering one body, and people seem to notice less, too. The chain-gang, let's-all-hold-hands-and-snake-through strategy never works out well, and you can do a lot better by yourself

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You're not bogged down by social obligations, like taking the perfect Instagram photograph with all your friends that prove you all went and saw that awesome band. Unless you're the confident type, you probably won't draw attention to yourself by taking a selfie at the event to prove you went solo. You also don't have to sacrifice the real estate you claimed in the front row to accompany your friend to the bathroom, the bar, etc.

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People watching. As though those two words aren't self-explanatory enough, there is an eerie joy in being the unseen observer. It can be pretty fascinating to note the age and gender demographic the musician draws, and whether they pull from strictly the hipster crowd or if they have fans that also listen to One Direction. Or, if you're weird like me, you can gawk at the hip piercings, tattoos and hairstyles or count the number of obscure, thrift-shop printed button-ups you see. None of it is ever quite noticeable until you're killing time before a show

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Airplane-syndrome. Just like when you're hurtling at approximately 500 mph at 35,000 feet above sea level, at a concert, you're trapped in a room for a finite amount of time with people you're in all likelihood never going to see ever again. It's the perfect time to bust out that embarrassing dance move or sport that outfit you aren't sure you can pull off.

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Being by yourself can be therapeutic. We all listen to music and go to shows to unwind, so why not use a concert as your personal form of meditation?

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The show is more personal. When you see a performer with a friend, the experience is split between your connection with the musician and with your companion. You exchange glances when the artist plays their mega-hit or whisper criticisms about the performance and nod along when your friend qualifies. Alone, you only rely on your own influence. You don't need to be a writer to jot down your opinion later. You might be surprised at your discovery.

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Don't sweat it if you get to the venue and you feel a burning need for social interaction. You already have one thing in common with every single person in the room: you're all there for the same reason.

By: Alexa Girkout

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