LAUNDRY DAY Is a Gen Z Force to Be Reckoned With

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Photo: Camilla Ffrench

LAUNDRY DAY is constantly evolving. Since their inception less than three years ago, the five high schoolers have released two albums, an EP, and a handful of singles. They have also performed several gigs in the New York area and are gearing up for their first nationwide headlining tour. The alternative pop-rock-hip-hop band from New York’s Hell’s Kitchen district is just doing their own thing, and they are doing a pretty amazing job of it so far.

Citing inspirations like BROCKHAMPTON and Tyler, The Creator, this genre-bending group is tweaking their DIY sound inconsistently unpredictable directions. Every song they put out sounds different from the one before and after. The group’s ability to experiment with different moods, lyrics, and instrumentation, along with how they use those tools, keeps their discography exciting, leaving listeners eager to hear what’s next. 

Their coming-of-age lyrics and sound are bright, young, and reflect the group’s young age without sounding adolescent. LAUNDRY DAY is documenting and creating art during years of major growth, which adds even more edge and acclaim to the up-and-coming band. There are seemingly no boundaries for the group. Well, except for the fact that they have to balance the insanity that is high school life, but that isn’t stopping them. 

LAUNDRY DAY is not to be taken for granted, despite their young ages, they have spent hours and hours on end tweaking their sound, fine-tuning their distinctive brand, and maturing along with their sound.

LAUNDRY DAY was formed during the group’s freshman year of high school. Sawyer Nunes, one of the vocalists and guitarists for the group, released a solo EP that year which sparked his excitement for creating music. After singer Jude Lipkin wrote a song for his girlfriend, he turned to Nunes to produce it, who learned how to do so on his own using GarageBand. Lipkin and Nunes began working together on more music with some aid from what would become future members of the band. LAUNDRY DAY began to slowly fall into place, with Henry Pearl on bass, Henry Weingartner on guitar, and Etai Abramovich on drums; but that doesn’t restrict them from switching up who plays what as they further experiment with and explore their sound and musical abilities.

They released their first full-length project Trumpet Boy in 2018. They sat down and worked for hours on end, focused on creating the best music they possibly could. They weren’t just messing around and making music for fun. They all became deeply engaged with the idea of creating something special, so they put time into experimenting with lyrics, vocals, and instruments, as well as discovering how they wanted to present themselves to the world.

In 2019, the quintet released their third album HOMESICK. They finished their album in sunny Los Angeles at Rick Rubin’s Shangri-La studio, completing four songs there, including the opening track “10 SPEED.” BROCKHAMPTON’s Romil Hemnani, an idol turned mentor to the group, assisted with the completion of the album, and even offered his drum talents to a track.

The future is incredibly bright for LAUNDRY DAY. The band wants to keep their DIY sound and stay true to certain roots that make them unique. In such a technology-driven world, it is no surprise that younger artists are able to gain exposure independently when they put their music out into the world on platforms like Spotify, Soundcloud, AWAL, and others. These types of services have made it easier for DIY artists to gain traction in the music community. 

If listeners who fall upon a song and dig a band’s sound early on, the result can be huge–take Clairo, Billie Eilish, Cuco, and even LAUNDRY DAY for example. Music has never been more accessible, and putting music out into the world has never been easier. LAUNDRY DAY is a product of this new cultural shift, and we are thankful for that.

So, what’s next for the group? Well, you can catch LAUNDRY DAY on their headlining ‘All My Friends Tour’ this August, as the band makes another massive step towards becoming a cultural phenomenon.

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